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Bjorn
I have a bit of a problem at work.

We rent a space from another business, and as part of our rent get internet access.

They have a sys admin who is insanely paranoid, and only wants registered users on "his" network.

Because we rely so much on freelancers there is a constant stream of new people with laptops in our office. I want to provide them with WiFi, but the sys admin says NO. There is no reasoning with this guy, and the people we rent space from have complete faith in him.

I set up a WiFi network last year, one of those ones where you have to know the name to find it, thinking that would keep it hidden, but the sys admin found it because it was constantly assigning new ip addresses.

I'm not very technical, but I was wondering if any of you would know a way around this. I thought of having static IPs on the WiFi router, so it wouldn't appear like they're rotating, but I don't know if that'll work.

Cheers
Razor
Nope. If you're on IPv4, he can simply +1 scan the entire (probably small) range of IPs or simply the internal-facing local IPs and he will ALWAYS find your access point provided you're using their internet to serve the thing, regardless of whether or not it has a static IP.

Furthermore, there are devices built to pick up wifi signals on a basic electromagnetic wave level in order to diagnose interference issues. WiFi is essentially impossible to hide from someone who knows what they're looking for.

Resistance is futile.

Sorry.
shandyman5
QUOTE(Bjorn @ Oct 24 2011, 11:33 AM) *
I have a bit of a problem at work.

We rent a space from another business, and as part of our rent get internet access.

They have a sys admin who is insanely paranoid, and only wants registered users on "his" network.

Because we rely so much on freelancers there is a constant stream of new people with laptops in our office. I want to provide them with WiFi, but the sys admin says NO. There is no reasoning with this guy, and the people we rent space from have complete faith in him.

I set up a WiFi network last year, one of those ones where you have to know the name to find it, thinking that would keep it hidden, but the sys admin found it because it was constantly assigning new ip addresses.

I'm not very technical, but I was wondering if any of you would know a way around this. I thought of having static IPs on the WiFi router, so it wouldn't appear like they're rotating, but I don't know if that'll work.

Cheers


WTF is wrong with this guy... who the hell cares???? Seems like a jackass.
Bjorn
Yep.

On the bright side, rent is dirt-cheap (we basically pay it by printing ads for our landlords) but the WiFi problem is kinda coming to a head.

Right now we have a bajillion CAT5 cables and routers strewn around our office.

Is there a way to make a WiFi router look more like a wired router, cuz they don't seem to give two shits about those?
Razor
QUOTE(shandyman5 @ Oct 24 2011, 01:45 PM) *
WTF is wrong with this guy... who the hell cares???? Seems like a jackass.


I didn't want to go there, but I will.

His paranoia is justified.

I am currently taking a class in advanced networking and security, and you would be simply blown away by how fucking dumb many generic network users are. People often carry around viruses or go ludicrously unprotected like hippies at fucking Woodstock. The only way to have a truly secure, unmolested network is to be a benevolent dictator (even if this guy forgot the benevolent part).

I used to be all "fuck everyone, I'll protect myself", but it's all fun and games until the network you're on is unusable because other people are so ignorant as to what ads they click online, etc.

Would you really want to take that risk if you were a network admin with the sole task of making sure things run smoothly?
b0mb3r
QUOTE(Razor @ Oct 24 2011, 11:04 AM) *
I didn't want to go there, but I will.

His paranoia is justified.

I am currently taking a class in advanced networking and security, and you would be simply blown away by how fucking dumb many generic network users are. People often carry around viruses or go ludicrously unprotected like hippies at fucking Woodstock. The only way to have a truly secure, unmolested network is to be a benevolent dictator (even if this guy forgot the benevolent part).

I used to be all "fuck everyone, I'll protect myself", but it's all fun and games until the network you're on is unusable because other people are so ignorant as to what ads they click online, etc.

Would you really want to take that risk if you were a network admin with the sole task of making sure things run smoothly?

if people like you ran IT, nothing would get done... security is a compromise of how much risk you are willing to accept.

@BJorn, would the IT guy be open to a guest network? They have something similar setup at work where it will prompt users for username/password to access the internet.
Jacob Photo
if rent is cheap, why dont you just buy your own internet?
Bjorn
@Jacob: We can't. We rent phone lines from the building on their network and we can't pay to run cable into the office. I have considered buying one of those 3G hotspots, but I think we would exceed the bandwidth limitations pretty quickly.

@B0mb3r: There is something like this in place, but the sys admin won't give one to anyone who isn't employed by us. Freelancers don't count. Also, we're in a part of the building that is really poorly served by the existing WiFi.
skr
He should at least look into the possibility to segregate your WIFI access point to a different subnet and VLAN so that none of your traffic would even touch their environment. IF it's a licensing issue with his router leasing addresses and connecting peers, then there's not much anyone can do. He SHOULD be able to setup a guest network that is segregated from the main network though.

What type of business does your landlord run? If it's a type of business where client data is essential to the business functions at a financial level, then it's within his diligence to keep his network as secure as possible. It's not necessarily a douchy thing.

Either he's just saying no because he doesn't want to do it out of laziness or lack of knowledge, or there's a security compliance issue that's stopping him from making the request.

Probably a little bit of both.

Edit: You're probably better off just having an 8 port switch available on a table for your freelancers to use.

I administrate my systems and network here at the company I work for. All of our guest traffic is connected through a hidden SSID and our main traffic uses RADIUS authentication to connect to our resources.
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