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GFWilliams
I'd quite like to learn how to do proper painting with light etc (like the reventon pic on the main forum).

What type of light stick is best? I am thinking that it needs to be quite long and preferably not LED as you then get little streaks as opposed to nice smooth ones.

Also, where could I get one from?

Thank you smile.gif

George
GFWilliams
Someone must be able to 'shed some light' on the subject smile.gif
GFWilliams
John,

Thank you very much for the help! Much appreciated!
I think that I will get a softbox first, then get a torch when funds allow biggrin.gif

George
Konrad Janicki
I'm not so good like the others but here is somthing from me

lighten with a fluo lamp abount 60 cm long with its own build in battery, but it's not very good to hold,
- the color balance is crazy, most of the time I was working with it I had to make it b&w to make it look good,
I need to find me something more handy becouse working with mine isn't so comfortable
I'm painting with an open source whithout any softboxes
Martin
The painting can be done bursting a flash mode with a softbox aswell. But you can't get the effect that wee has in the background with this method.
Seethegrim
QUOTE(Martin @ Feb 26 2010, 09:56 AM) *
The painting can be done bursting a flash mode with a softbox aswell. But you can't get the effect that wee has in the background with this method.


I used this method for ages back when lightpainting was the huge craze.
Nike SB'd
Honestly unless you have some kind of track-and-wheel dolly to roll the flashlight on this technique is always going to look sloppy. It's just damn near impossible to hold a flashlight COMPLETELY level without shaking while you walk. What you're left with is a line that jitters as it moves along the body and in some cases goes from a sharp edge to soft edge along the way. I guess it will get you that "oh wow" response from anyone that doesn't shoot cars or a noob, but to the trained eye it looks amateurish.
Seethegrim
I'm thinking of trying a roller that uses those special lawnmower inflatable wheels instead of solid rubber ones. The ones that have the hectic tread.
The inflation (if left at half inflated) will absorb most (if not all) minor bumps on your tar surface. Of course, not if you're shooting in the mountains...

Mr.D
heh, Seagram you will be the official crazy guy sneaking around night time with shopping cart and disco lights wink.gif
All jokes aside, I used a couple of those wheels for non lighting related project and it works ok if you let the air out.
It still needs to be a fairly smooth surface

This is an old test pic, straight out of the camera and free hand. However I fking hate the "single light" technic and I have moved on in life =)

tonymophoto.com
QUOTE(Nike SB'd @ Mar 3 2010, 09:55 PM) *
Honestly unless you have some kind of track-and-wheel dolly to roll the flashlight on this technique is always going to look sloppy. It's just damn near impossible to hold a flashlight COMPLETELY level without shaking while you walk. What you're left with is a line that jitters as it moves along the body and in some cases goes from a sharp edge to soft edge along the way. I guess it will get you that "oh wow" response from anyone that doesn't shoot cars or a noob, but to the trained eye it looks amateurish.


Agreed, you have to be on a really, really smooth surface for the line to be crisp.

It does however work decent for detail shots where you only have the length of the bulb or so in the frame. The less you have to move the light, the better it looks.
Blue Devil
also has a lot to do with the angle... wink.gif




work with the lines of the body... and it will help.
Nate047
Interesting ideas in this thread... I'm not crazy about the look, but the 3-series BMW up there looks pretty good for straight out of camera especially for hand held thumbs_up.gif
AmuseGT1
I really only try to use this technique on really dark or black cars. Seems to be the best way (for me at least) to light them.

I recently did a rig shot on my friends G37 and I wanted to show the car in motion with clean streaks, but I realized to make it look more natural the streaks had to be somewhat "sloppy" as I figured natural light coming from the streets wouldn't be so clean on the car.

Other than that, I have always wondered if a diffuser over the light source might help in making the light "cleaner", but I haven't tested it yet
Seethegrim
QUOTE(AmuseGT1 @ Apr 9 2010, 05:49 PM) *
I really only try to use this technique on really dark or black cars. Seems to be the best way (for me at least) to light them.


I actually hold no bars for car colour. You'll be surprised how nicely it works for white cars:



john jovic
QUOTE(Seethegrim @ Apr 12 2010, 11:21 PM) *
I actually hold no bars for car colour. You'll be surprised how nicely it works for white cars:





+1

It works very well on any colour, metallic, solid colour, dark, light, whatever.

JJ
Blue Devil
agreed.. i done white cars with light painting... even thought the effect is more dramatic in darker cars... it also works great on white...

and i agree with the shape of the car... it's the hardest part of light painting. Cars with no hard edges are a bit of a pain to decide where to start and where to end... or what lines to follow...
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