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Lancer007







QUOTE
The engine provided was the B18 with dual SU carburettors, producing 100 hp (75 kW). This variant (named B18B) had a different camshaft from, and higher compression than, the slightly less powerful twin-carb B18D used in the contemporary Amazon 122S. The 'new' B18 was actually developed from the pre-existing B36 V8 engine employed in Volvo trucks at the time. This cut production costs, as well as furnishing the P1800 with a strong engine boasting five main crank bearings. The B18 was matched with the new and more robust M40 manual gearbox through 1963. From 1963 to 1972 the M41 gearbox with electrically actuated overdrive was a popular option. Two overdrive types where used, the D-Type through 1969, and the J-type through 1973. The J-type had a slightly shorter ratio of 0.797:1 as opposed to 0.756:1 for the D-type. The addition of this overdrive gave the 1800 series a defacto fifth gear, allowing it greater fuel efficiency and decreased drivetrain wear. Cars sold without overdrive had a numerically lower geared differential, which had the interesting effect of giving them a somewhat higher top speed (just under 120 mph) than the more popular overdrive models. This was because the non-overdrive cars could reach the engine's redline in top gear, while the overdrive-equipped cars could not, giving the latter a top speed of roughly 110 mph (177 km/h).

As time progressed, Jensen had problems with quality control, so the contract was ended early at 6,000 cars. In 1963 production was moved to Volvo's Lundby Plant in Gothenburg and the car's name was changed to 1800S (the 'S' indicating Swedish assembly). The engine was improved with an additional 8 hp (6 kW). In 1966 the four-cylinder engine was updated to 115 hp (86 kW). In 1969 the B18 engine was replaced with the 2-liter B20B variant of the B20 giving 118 bhp (89 kW), though it kept the designation 1800S. For 1970 numerous changes came with the fuel-injected 1800E, which had the B20E engine with Bosch D-Jetronic fuel injection and a revised camshaft and produced 130 bhp (97 kW) from its 2-litres without sacrificing fuel economy. Top speed was around 190 km/h (just under 120 mph) and acceleration from 0-100 km was 9.5 seconds. In addition, the 1970 model was the first 1800 to appear with four-wheel disc brakes. Prior to this, the 1800 series had front discs and rear drums.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volvo_P1800
Lancer007
I saw one of these today as I was gettign lunch and it was quite striking to see. I feel awkward calling a Volvo good looking that's not one of the newer ones, but I was really struck by this. Nothing ground breaking in it's development but a neat little car.
clarkma5
I want one when I'm old. Cool cool cool.
Uwe
Solid cool.

In Germany we called the 1800 ES wagon "Schneewittchensarg" (Snow White's coffin).
Bjorn
^my neighbour has one of those, such a good looking car...

Very cool.
nismo
QUOTE
We've reported on high-mileage cars here before. There was the Jetta diesel that Volkswagen found in Ohio with 562,000 miles on its odometer. Then there was the Saab 900 that had traveled 1,001,385 miles in its lifetime. Finally, there was also a 1995 Dodge Ram that passed the million-mile mark. We know of these cars because Volkswagen, Saab and Dodge sought them out and have been using their mere existence as marketing tools. At least the driver of the Volkswagen was given a 1-year lease on a new Volkswagen Touareg V10 TDI. The Dodge Ram owner got a call from Tom LaSorda and a book about DaimlerChrysler's history, while the Saab owner actually had to buy himself a new set of Swedish wheels.

All high-mileage vehicles still traveling our nation's roads, however, must tip their rusty hats to this one, Irv Gordon's 1966 Volvo P1800 with 2.6 million miles under its belt-line. Gordon has been the only owner of this P1800 since it was purchased new in 1966. A 125-mile round trip daily commute and a penchant for regular maintenance got the car this far, and in 1998 it made the Guinness Book of World Records at just 1.69 million miles.

Since retired from teaching science, Gordon now plans on hitting the 3 million-mile mark sometime in the next five years. Keep in mind, he's slowed down to 80,000 miles/year from his record pace of over 100,000 miles/year in 2002. While not promising to retire the car once it hits 3 million miles, Gordon says he might break down before the car does. We hope if that if he does reach that milestone, Volvo will pony up a free replacement for his Energizer Bunny-esqe P1800. How about a C30?
speedyK
It wasn't rated highly as a driver's car.

Always looked interesting and different though.

But the UK TV series, "The Saint", with Roger Moore in the role of the very smarmy and preposterously successful (with women and in fights) Simon Templar was, for me as a kid at least, negative biggrin.gif


I'd never say it was really cool, as it was for people who wanted to look "sporty". Until recently, it would have to get an uncool. But now I'm prepared to be neutral as it at least adds an individual touch.
armandjones82
That car seems to be very nice. I think having some good parts like what Dayco and the like would provide will give much emphasis on this vehicle to be more cool and slick and more efficient in running. Kinda reminds me of old school cars to be used today.
Cyclone
Someone who lives near me drives one that is red. Seeing it for the very first time, I could have almost sworn that it was a Jaguar. The Volvo badge on the rear made me realize how wrong I was and I instantly fell in love. This car is definitely Sub-Zero
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