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Full Version: Acura NSX (1990-2001)
Dieselstation Car Forums > The Cool Wall > The Cool Wall > Frozen
clarkma5
Engines: 2,977 cc C30A V6 (270 bhp and 210 lbft) (1990-1996 5MT, 1990+ 4AT)
3,179 cc C32B V6 (290 bhp and 224 lbft) (1997+ 6MT)
Curb weights: 3010 pounds (US-spec 1991 NSX)
3090 pounds (US-spec 1997 NSX-T)
3160 pounds (US-spec 2001 NSX-T)





QUOTE
Upon its release in 1990, the NSX was a design concept well ahead of its time. At only 1,170 mm (46 in) in height (only 141.3 mm (5.56 in) taller than the legendary Ford GT40), the car showcased Honda's cutting edge racing pedigree and technology at a time when the company were literally making history while totally dominating Formula One motor racing. The Japanese car maker's race track innovations and competitive history were further exemplified on the road by the NSX's ultra-rigid, ultra-light all aluminum monocoque chassis, all aluminum suspension, boasting the world's first production car with titanium connecting rods, with forged pistons and ultra high-revving capabilities the redline was at a lofty 8,000 rpm - all traits usually associated with track and race engineered motor cars.

In 1995, in North America, the NSX-T replaced the standard coupe entirely as the only trim available, with the notable exceptions of the Zanardi Edition NSX in 1999 and a handful of special ordered post-1997/pre-2002 3.2 liter coupes. The removable roof reduced the chassis rigidity of the NSX and added about 100 pounds (45 kg) of structural reinforcements. In addition to this major change, the suspensions have also been softened to improve ride, comfort, and tire wear, at the expense of ultimate handling. The suspension redesign was also intended to reduce the sudden-oversteer problems that plagued most mid-engined vehicles.

1997 brought the biggest changes to the performance of the current generation NSX for the Japanese domestic versions and abroad. For 1997 engine displacement increased from 3.0 L to 3.2 L. This new 3.2 L C32B engine gave it slightly more rated power: from 277 PS (204 kW; 273 hp) to 280 PS (206 kW; 276 hp) while torque increased from 285 Nm (210 lbft) to 305 Nm (225 lbft) (manual transmission only). The 4-speed automatic model still used the 3.0 L engine and power output. Another big change was the adoption of the 6-speed manual transmission. The combination of slightly-increased power and torque, 6-speed manual gearbox, and optimized gear ratio produced improved straight-line acceleration. The new NSX rang up better numbers than the power and torque improvements may suggest over previous model NSXs. 0-60 mph time dropped from 5.4 seconds to as low as 5.0 seconds for the NSX-S Zero. Other notable changes include a brake rotor size increase from 12 in (300 mm) to 13 inches (330 mm) which necessitated larger wheels and tires, a new aluminum alloy to further reduce weight and increase rigidity, and a transponder in the key.






Phix
Extremely cool. Ultra cool. Sub-Zero Fatality Cool.

You even had Ayrton Senna fine tuning the suspension design at one point although I don't know if his fine tuning was as extensive as, say, Michael Schumacher's involvement with the Enzo/FXX.

But, still, even forgoing the F1 connection this is just cool on so many levels. Believe it or not I've yet to see one in the wild. sad.gif
Razor
Clark, all your images are dead.

Cool.
clarkma5
I know Razor, my site's fucked right now. I'm working on it.

And I voted cool but I was actually somewhere between neutral and cool...it is a surprisingly heavy car, and I'm not a fan of the move to a Targa-only bodystyle. If this were just like the hardtop Type-R model or whatever then, yeah, definitely frozen. But the rest of the lineup...just cool.
moe
I never realized they moved to a Targa-only body, perhaps that was a US-only thing?.

I've only ever seen three or four in the wild, but I've been very close to one in particular, which was owned by a friend. In any case, I'd give up my left nut to own one. It's one of my favorite cars of all time, and IMHO, one of the finest sports cars ever built.
clarkma5
Yeah it is a US-only thing, moe (you'll notice that this poll is for the Acura NSX, not the Honda NSX).

BTW site is fixed.
Zenix13
where is the so cool even your grandma would love it option?
MustangAficionado
They look at least two time better in person. It's not even close.

You can change my vote to cool from undecided. My gripes with it don't effect its coolness
infinity
Haha I forgot about TNN.
GTR
hands down still the one of the most awesome cars for 19 years and still ongoing

They may be old, but most people still give this car a resale price of at least $20,000 (last time I checked)

FROZEN
speedyK
I always thought this was cool especially with Senna's input.

I considered trading in my Opel speedster and 300ZX Twin Turbo for one, as I expected it to give me the best of both: sublime mid-engined feel and handling on the one side and a great 6 cylinder engine with Japanese solid and practical build on the other.

I test drove a one-owner, low mileage, accident-free one that had been prepared for sale by a leading Swiss garage. One of the biggest disappointments of my entire life!!!

Puny, fiddley catches that were poorly located. Controls that were not intuitive. Very little room inside for the size, not even decent storage space for bits and pieces as a car for longdistance touring really needs so poorly packaged. And the visibilty backwards is not that great as the engine cover is quite high.

Then I drove it. Felt that I was sat on the car rather than in it. Wooden, lumpy ride in comparison to the Lotus-chassied Speedster like a wheel wanted to fall off. The engine sounded nice and it was fairly responsive, but nowhere near as involving as my Opel Speedster which I 'd driven to the garage in. My route home was over a small alpine pass that blast in the setting autumn sun was epic. The test drive had made me aware of how even a much-hyped car like the NSX could not compare with the precision and fantastic nimbleness of the Lotus chassis. And when I then drove my 300ZX, I appreciated the far more comfortable and well-fitting multi-adjustable sports seats (even side bolster width) and all the other, better designed and better built components - along with the practical 2+2 seating and rear hatch so much more comfortable and useful than the similarly-sized NSX.

The NSX is a compromise between big and luxurious and mid-engined nimbleness that simply didn't work for me.

I'm not surprised if you don't believe me though. I would never have thought it either till I drove one myself.
Razor
QUOTE(speedyK @ May 10 2009, 05:27 PM) *
I always thought this was cool especially with Senna's input.

I considered trading in my Opel speedster and 300ZX Twin Turbo for one, as I expected it to give me the best of both: sublime mid-engined feel and handling on the one side and a great 6 cylinder engine with Japanese solid and practical build on the other.

I test drove a one-owner, low mileage, accident-free one that had been prepared for sale by a leading Swiss garage. One of the biggest disappointments of my entire life!!!

Puny, fiddley catches that were poorly located. Controls that were not intuitive. Very little room inside for the size, not even decent storage space for bits and pieces as a car for longdistance touring really needs so poorly packaged. And the visibilty backwards is not that great as the engine cover is quite high.

Then I drove it. Felt that I was sat on the car rather than in it. Wooden, lumpy ride in comparison to the Lotus-chassied Speedster like a wheel wanted to fall off. The engine sounded nice and it was fairly responsive, but nowhere near as involving as my Opel Speedster which I 'd driven to the garage in. My route home was over a small alpine pass that blast in the setting autumn sun was epic. The test drive had made me aware of how even a much-hyped car like the NSX could not compare with the precision and fantastic nimbleness of the Lotus chassis. And when I then drove my 300ZX, I appreciated the far more comfortable and well-fitting multi-adjustable sports seats (even side bolster width) and all the other, better designed and better built components - along with the practical 2+2 seating and rear hatch so much more comfortable and useful than the similarly-sized NSX.

The NSX is a compromise between big and luxurious and mid-engined nimbleness that simply didn't work for me.

I'm not surprised if you don't believe me though. I would never have thought it either till I drove one myself.


You should host the Swiss Top Gear.
clarkma5
Frankly I can believe that, speedy. I've always thought the NSX had a high curb weight for its power and mission which would have impacts on how it drives and it is, of course, almost 20 years old now, fraught with the difficulties of midengined packaging. Plus how could anything anywhere ever made ever live up to the hype of the NSX? If you've watched much Best Motoring then you know what I mean, they describe it as the second coming of jesus multiple times per episode it seems.

Part of me thinks this all comes down to what you expect and what you compare this car to. I'm always fascinated by that concept, that a car that's good in one segment may be terrible in another...there truly are many orders of magnitude separating cars across the entire spectrum. For instance, a Mazda 6 is sporty when it comes to midsized sedan, but it's dull and soft when you compare it to hot hatches. Then a hot hatch doesn't have what it takes to compare to something like an M3, which can't really compare against something like a 911 GT3, which can't really compare to a supercar, etc. The NSX seems to be trapped in that somehow, I dunno. I still like it but realistically there's lots of cars ahead of it in line that I'd own first.
Synesthesia
Huh, interesting. Still really freaking cool though.
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