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moe
So quite a few publications (Autocar, DR) have opinion pieces on whether Porsche should be dropping diesels in its cars or not. Of course, this is spurred by the announcement that Porsche was going to cram an Audi V6 diesel in the Cayenne. Some don't seem to care, whilst others think it the way forward, and then there are the purists who believe it's absolute blasphemy. What are your thoughts?

Me personally? Having read Chris Harris's column over at DR, I have to agree with him. It's going in the Cayenne, which itself is kind of blasphemous to Porsche, but it was created with the intent to provide the company with enough funding to keep making the brilliant sports cars they're known for. As long as there's a GT2 and GT3, who cares what they put in the Cayenne, and for that matter the upcoming Panamera as well. Still, I can't help but think...couldn't Porsche have taken a different route? Just look at Ferrari, they're plenty successfuly, but have never had to succumb to making an SUV or slotting a diesel in a car with the prancing horse up front.
duality
isnt cayenne their most volume car; ie it sells a lot? if the customer wants diesel, which in the SUV market is a great option, then Porsche is going in the right way. They already moved away from the Uber sports market with the Cayenne, so why not offer a Diesel as well?

With the Panemera, its clear that Porsche is looking to diversify their portfolio...and a Diesel just adds to that. Plus as you and Chris said, there's the GT2/3 on the side...that should remain untouched.
Bjorn
I'm not 100% positive about this, but I don't think Ferrari is independent...I'm pretty sure they are owned by the FIAT group. If that's the case, it's kinda unfair IMO to compare Porsche, which is independent (they pretty much own VW, not the other way around, as I thought for a long time) to Ferrari, which has the backing of the FIAT group.

I have always been a supporter of the Cayenne, for the reasons Moe stated, and think that a diesel is a natural fit, assuming the diesel they drop in is tuned in the direction of performance. If the engine is the archetypal diesel; slow revving and dull I'll be disappointed, although Audi seems to have some pretty exciting diesels...
moe
Fiat was in trouble for a long time, with Ferrari holding strong...they're largely autonomous, Fiat offered little financial assitance (if any), and Montezemola's now the chair of the entire Fiat group not just Ferrari. That's not that different from Porsche and Wiedeking IMO.
duality
QUOTE(Bjorn @ Nov 23 2008, 09:16 AM) *
I'm not 100% positive about this, but I don't think Ferrari is independent...I'm pretty sure they are owned by the FIAT group. If that's the case, it's kinda unfair IMO to compare Porsche, which is independent (they pretty much own VW, not the other way around, as I thought for a long time) to Ferrari, which has the backing of the FIAT group.

Opposite me thinks...FIAT would actually impose on Ferrari to make more mainstream cars...more revenue in the end. Instead of saying 'you do what you want', they would play the management money card.

Plus Porsche is the most profitable car company...
moe
QUOTE(duality @ Nov 23 2008, 09:26 PM) *
Opposite me thinks...FIAT would actually impose on Ferrari to make more mainstream cars...more revenue in the end. Instead of saying 'you do what you want', they would play the management money card.

Plus Porsche is the most profitable car company...


Like I stated before, as far as I know, Ferrari was given free reign. Yes, it was owned by the Fiat group, but while Fiat called the shots (rather disastrously) for the rest of the group, Ferrari was allowed blossom. They did many of their own business dealings such as buying out a sunglass company, recreating a dead fragrance brand, and buying Maserati (which was later handed over to Fiat to take care of). It wasn't exactly clear cut, yes they were owned by Fiat group, but they very much operated as if they were independent. Look where Montezemolo's shrewd business dealings have gotten him. From the head of a small but prestigious sports car maker, to the chair of a large automotive group. I think Wiedeking and Porsche aren't that different at all, they just tackled things a bit differently.

Also, isn't Porsche the most profitable car company on a per car basis? I believe the most profitable overall was Toyota. Of course, with the way things are today, all of this may have changed.
clarkma5
A diesel in the Cayenne is fine...Panamera maaaaaaybe. Boxster/Cayman/911 definitely not.

My understanding is that porsche's intent was to use hybrid technology because it retained more of the sportiness that people expect from Porsche. I dunno, I like the idea of just downsizing the cars, downsizing the engines, squeezing out all the possible efficiency...it's amazing what they've done in the last 5 years with reducing emissions and fuel consumption without resorting to diesel or hybrid technology.
Aircooled
I'm chill with it. I want to drive a diesel car one day, the engines make incredible torque but they don't rev as much, oh well. I'm not sure how I would feel if they had a diesel option for say a GT3, after all an oil burner did win the 24 hours of le mans....
Ozi
That is the most fucked up mentality ever. I guess some porsche owners might think that if a car in their line up has diesel engine, then their image or charisma goes down. Most logical think would be, if you don't like it, don't buy it.
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